• Spectrum of Life

Postpartum Depression and Baby Blues Syndrome

According to American Pregnancy Organisation, there are at least 70-80% of all new mothers suffered with baby blues. Usually baby blues last for about a week and not more than 2 weeks. However, if an extended more than 2 weeks than it will be in high risk of postpartum depression.


A new life and a new member has arrived in the family usually bring in joy, excitement and even fresh scene into the family. People will tell you wrong if you feel sad, unhappy or even depress about it. Many would choose rather not to talk about the negative feeling especially the mothers. However, it is more common than you think of. What this scenario are quite common known as baby blues syndrome or in extension postpartum depression. This situation is quite uncommonly explained in baby books guide.


According to American Pregnancy Organisation, there are at least 70-80% of all new mothers suffered with baby blues. Usually baby blues last for about a week and not more than 2 weeks. However, if an extended more than 2 weeks than it will be in high risk of postpartum depression.


Baby Blues

1. You feel emotional and/or profoundly vulnerable such as feeling incapable of being a mother.

2. Your symptoms last about one/two weeks after giving birth.

3. You also might experience mood instability, depressed mood, sadness, irritability, anxiety, lack of concentration and/or feelings of dependency.


Postpartum Depression

If you have a personal or family history of bipolar mood disorder (manic-depressive illness) or schizophrenia then you are most at risk. It is very important to mention this at your check-up appointments.

1. Your symptoms last longer than two weeks after giving birth, are much more severe than baby blues symptoms and interfere with functioning.

2. You might experience feelings of anxiety, sadness (crying a lot), depression, irritability, guilt, lack of interest in the baby, changes in eating and sleeping habits, trouble concentrating, thoughts of hopelessness and sometimes even thoughts of harming the baby or yourself, rumination, obsessions, loss of interest in usual activities, feeling worthless, incompetent or inadequate to cope with your baby, fatigue and/or excessive worry about the baby's health.


The risk of having postpartum depression are always higher